Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs)

Program or Topic Area Leader

Rick Hobrla

Goals

The United States and Canadian governments identified 43 areas on the Great Lakes that had serious water quality problems known to cause beneficial use impairment of the shared aquatic resources. These areas have been formally designated by the two governments as Areas of Concern. Michigan has 12 Areas of Concern.

Program Expertise

  • Physical — Hydrologic — Restoration / BMP
  • Physical — Geomorphology — Lakeshore processes
  • Chemical — Water Quality (nutrients, pH, DO, etc.) — Restoration / BMP
  • Chemical — Water Quality (nutrients, pH, DO, etc.) — Historical perspectives
  • Chemical — Water Quality (nutrients, pH, DO, etc.) — Predicting / Modeling trends
  • Chemical — Pollutants / Contaminants — Identification and monitoring
  • Chemical — Pollutants / Contaminants — Removal / Restoration / Remediation
  • Biological — Fish — Restoration / Conservation / BMP
  • Biological — General Community Structures — Habitat restoration
  • Biological — General Community Structures — Cumulative human impacts
  • Human Dimensions — Watershed Management — Cooperative planning
  • Human Dimensions — Water Quality Policy and Management — State policy and strategies

Primary Stakeholder Audience

  • Decision making community (Government at all levels)

Program Focus

Each AOC has an AOC coordinator, who works with stakeholders to remediate Beneficial Use Impairments and move the AOC toward delisting.

Rouge River, Clinton River – Contact: Jennifer Tewkesbury (tewkesburyj@michigan.gov)

Kalamazoo River, Manistique River, Saginaw River/Bay, St. Marys River, White Lake – Contact: John Riley (rileyj2@michigan.gov)

St. Clair River, River Raisin, Detroit River – Contact: Melanie Foose (foosem@michigan.gov)

Deer Lake – Contact: Stephanie Swart (swarts@michigan.gov)

Menominee River, Muskegon Lake, Torch Lake – Contact: Sharon Baker (bakers9@michigan.gov)